Gardening in Small Spaces

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The whole food, clean eating trend has been sweeping the nation, as consumers are growing more wary of eating processed food laden with chemicals, pesticides and other lab-created components.

But it’s no secret that organic food and clean eating comes with a pretty hefty price tag. However, some advocates argue that spending your money on good food instead of medical bills saves you money in the long run. Touché. 

Instead of spending your Whole Paycheck at Whole Foods, how about taking your health and well-being into your own hands by getting a little down and dirty in the garden.

Now that summer is here, it’s the perfect time to polish your green thumb and get started on your own garden.

But wait; what if you don’t own your own home? What if you live in an apartment or condo and the only grass in your eye line is the local doggie doo-doo landing pad? What if your soil is that red clay that refuses to support organic life?

Don’t worry, there are plenty of alternatives for small space dwellers (or soil-challenged folks) to be able to get healthy, adopt cleaning eating and grow your own fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices!


Via Martha Stewart

Window Boxes:  If you don’t have a patio or space to plant your garden, a window box is the solution to your problem. Instead of planting traditional flowers in a window box, pick out your favorite herbs and shallow-rooting vegetables instead. Plus, no more backaches from leaning over to toil away in the garden; just throw open the window and pluck!

What to grow in window boxes: Lettuce, red radishes, spinach, scallions, garlic and strawberries.

Via Vegetable Garden Hub

The Potted Garden: If you have a patio that receives plenty of sunshine, you can take advantage of it by planting your garden in containers. All you have to do is pick up some inexpensive pots, soil and seedlings to begin growing your very own herbs and veggies.

What to grow in pots: Tomatoes, beans, beats, cucumbers, strawberries, peppers, lettuce, squash and herbs.

 Via The Garden Glove

Go Vertical: With small spaces come small patios and balconies. No worries, because you can take your garden vertical! Wall mounted Mason jars, like the ones pictured above, are great for your herb garden, while hanging pots or baskets can be a great alternative for bigger vegetable growing plants.

What to grow in hanging pots or baskets: Eggplants strawberries, small peppers, cherry tomatoes, lettuce, chives, cabbage, and mustard greens.

Via Martha Stewart

Cluster Similar Plants: If you’re really tight on space and can only fit a few pots on your patio, balcony or entrance area, you’re in luck, because many vegetables can be planted together in one pot and still thrive!

Plants that cohabitate well together: Asparagus and tomatoes; beans and celery, corn, cucumbers or strawberries; carrots and beans or tomatoes.

Now that you have some ideas on how to start growing your own food, you just have to decide who gets to share your bounty! Before you know it, you’ll be up to your ears in fresh fruits and veggies. Who’s coming for dinner?!

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